Australian Birds


Australian birds come in all shapes and sizes, from tiny native weebill birds to Emus that stand taller than I do. And the colours of some species are magnificent.

Although I am by no means an expert on Australian native birds, I have gathered together some information and presented it in the pages mentioned below about the various types of birds you are likely to find in and around Brisbane.

© Ed Dunens | Flickr.com - Emus Drinking from a Waterway

Some of these birds are common across the country, others live in reasonably small areas within Queensland or along the Eastern Coast.

Many you will be able to see during your visit (providing you are paying attention of course), but some are so rare in urban areas that you are unlikely to see them unless you visit a wildlife park or travel out of the city or up the coast.

Australian Parrots

Australian parrots are quite gregarious, noisy and very colorful. Their cousins, the cockatoos, are a bit less so in every respect, although they too can be noisy when they are in large flocks.

© Brisbane Walkabout | Crimson Rosella

© Brisbane Walkabout | Pink & Grey Galah

This page has photos of only some of the many varieties of parrots, cockatoos, and lorikeets in Australia.

Ground Birds

Not all of Australias ground birds are flightless like the Cassowary or the Emu. Many are capable of flight, but still their preferred habit and nesting areas are on the ground.

© Greg Schechter | Flickr.com - Pheasant Coucal

© James Niland | Flickr.com - Australian Brush Turkey

Birds in this category include the Australian Brush Turkey, the Masked Lapwing, the Pheasant Coucal and the Bush Stone Curlew, along with many, many others.

Small Birds

Australia has a large number of small birds ranging in size from 8 centimetres (around the two inch mark) to around 30 centimetres (12 inches).

© Wayne Butterworth | Flickr.com - Superb Fairy Wren

© Greg Schechter | Flickr.com - Weebill

Some of those very small birds are very bright and colourful whereas others are a dull single colour to allow them to blend into the bush better.

In Queensland, you are likely to find a wide variety of small birds including; Bar-Shouldered Doves, Regent Bowerbirds, many different types of Wrens and swallows and the ever present Willy Wagtail.

(Don't you just love that name?)

Water Birds

As pretty much all of the major cities of Australia are built on the coast or on a major waterway, you usually do not need to go far to see quite a few species of Australia's water birds.

© Miran Rijavec| Flickr.com - Australian Darter (cropped)

© Steve Haslam | Flickr.com - Black Swan (cropped)

The Australia White Ibis is a quite common sight in Australian cities, as are Stilts, Cormorants and Black Swans.

Australian Black Birds

Many people I know really do not like black birds like crows and ravens, but I find most of them rather striking.

Many of the birds that fall into this category are not actually black all over and some are grey rather than black!

© James Niland | Flickr.com - Torresian Crow (cropped)

© Lisa Hunt | Flickr.com - Australian Magpie (cropped)

The Blackbird species in Queensland included The Torresian Crow, the Pied Currawong, the Grey (and Pied) Butcherbird, the Black-faced Cuckoo-Strike and the Australian Magpie.

Large Birds and Australian Birds of Prey

Generally a bird is considered large if it is over 60 centimetres long (or tall).

For the purposes of this section of my site, I am including native birds over 30 Centimetres and Australian Birds of Prey on one page.

© Wayne Butterworth | Flickr.com - Whistling Kite (cropped)

© jae | Flickr.com - Eastern Osprey (cropped)



New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me your thoughts in the box below.